Eric Hirsh

pianist, composer, producer

Top Five Artists Whose Work I WishTo Explore Deeply in 2010

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Over a year ago I wrote a post about my top 10 favorite albums, mostly with a metric of personal fondness more than any sort of aesthetic consideration. As I look ahead to 2010, I see a very busy technologist (researching instruments for Zenph Sound Innovations) and bandleader (with The Beast and Orquesta GarDel) and new-husband (hi, Lauren!).  I want to make sure I am never too far from my deep passion for the arts, that need to appreciate and explore music, soaking it all up and seeing what sticks in the end.  There are a few artists in particular whose work and whose real-life struggles and philosophies have struck a chord with me, yet I’ve not yet had the time to get to know their music.  So in the spirit of end-of-year listmaking, here are my top five artists to get to know better in 2010.

5. King Tubby

Who knew that a sound engineer from Jamaica would have such a significant influence on electronic and hip hop musics?  Mixing (and re-mixing) as an art form, I love the delay-drenched sound of dub music, and it’s high time I take an in depth survey of one of the great pioneers.

4. John Hollenbeck

He is being called a modern jazz master.  With a prodigious output ranging from big band to chamber music to experimental improvisation, I identify with a lot of Hollenbeck’s contrapuntal/ostinato/polyrhythmic concepts and look forward to studying them.

3. Darius Milhaud

I love this guy, there is something fun about a French composer ahead of his own time falling in love with jazz and the music of Brazil.  What’s his take on it?  Let’s listen to La creation du monde and find out!

2. Astor Piazolla

I suspect one could spend a lifetime studying the music of this tango innovator.  He tried to write “proper” classical music, was ashamed of his jazzy tangos until Nadia Boulanger chided him for not being true to himself.  The rest was history, I suppose.  Such a fantastic combination of heart-string romanticism with improvisation with exacting composition, and I can still appreciate that it is based on music of the people, music for dancing.

1. Charles Ives

I’ve been told on occasion that my career path and my music remind people of Charles Ives.  How is it that an insurance salesman could conjure such poignant images of American life in such quirky compositions?  Again, a man ahead of his time.  I cried a bit when I heard “The Things Our Fathers Loved” from 114 Songs as well as “The Unanswered Question.”  I also look forward to reading a collection of his essays and other writings.

RUNNERS UP

Wayne Shorter, Fela Kuti, Bob Dylan, Me’Shell NdegéOcello, Nas

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